Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Historic Home Trade Show


Sunday, September 14th,  2014   
Historic Home Trade Show 
at the Golden Gate Club
135 Fisher Loop, San Francisco Presidio

The Historic Home Trade Show  will be sponsored in part by Artistic License- A Guild of Artisans and will be an essential event for all historic home lovers. Attendees  will find numerous booths with artisans and specialists in period home design and restoration, demonstrations,  speakers, food, music, and more!

Admission is only $5! 

Many members of Artistic License will exhibit including Arts and Crafts Period Textiles, Craftsman Tiles,  Adrian Card, Panache Lighting,  San Francsico Local Color Painting, Bob Buckter Color Consultant,  Skeeter Jones|Clearheart Restoration, Lorna Kollmeyer Ornamental Plaster, Lynne Rutter Murals & Decorative Painting, Debey Zito Fine Furniture and Design, and Paul Ivasez of Quality Lighting, along with many other services and product for the Historic and revival style home.  

For more information, please visit the website at www.historichometradeshow.com

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Berkeley Architectural Heritage 2013 Fall Lecture Series

:: Living with Arts & Crafts ::


Berkeley Architectural Heritage 2013 Fall Lecture Series

Thursdays, 9/26, 10/24, 11/14, 2013, at 7:30 pm
Hillside Club, 2286 Cedar Street, Berkeley, CA 94709
Tickets: $15 per lecture, $40 for the series


BAHA - The Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association - is pleased to announce three new fall lectures with a focus on Arts & Crafts. These lectures have never before been presented in California, and two of them are being created especially for BAHA.

The series kicks off on Thursday, September 26, when Dr. Kirby William Brown will present an illustrated talk on “The Tiles of California Faience, Berkeley, Cal., 1913–1959.” Berkeley-based California Faience created hand-crafted tiles and pottery for the high-end market. The firm’s most famous and influential tile installations are to be found at Hearst Castle. Featured will be several unique custom tile commissions that have never before been documented, along with a review of the tiles at Hearst Castle and examples of many architectural installations in the Berkeley area. Dr. Brown is currently writing the definitive book on the subject and will curate the exhibition Of Cottages and Castles: The Art of California Faience (22 Feb.–17 May 2015) at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento.


On Thursday, October 24, Arts & Crafts scholar  and Artistic License member Timothy L. Hansen will present “Sitting in Style: The Birth of a New Furniture Design,” in which he will offer little-known information about the beginnings of the American Arts & Crafts Mission-style furniture. Mr. Hansen will focus on furniture design from 1894 to 1900 in the San Francisco Bay Area, New York, and Grand Rapids, Michigan, with a new explanation of how the American Arts & Crafts furniture style emerged. On display will be several pieces of pre-1900 Arts & Crafts furniture.


The series will conclude on Thursday, November 14, with “Progressive Leaded Glass in Turn-of-the-Century America,” presented by stained-glass designer and scholar and Artistic License member Theodore Ellison will outline the development of decorative art glass as it grew away from the European tradition toward original idioms created by progressive artists, architects, and designers all over America. Focusing primarily on domestic work, the talk will look at various regional styles and will feature rarely seen images of leaded glass installations from private residences across the country.


All three lectures will be presented at the Hillside Club, 2286 Cedar Street, Berkeley, CA 94709, and will begin at 7:30 pm. Tickets ($15 per lecture, $40 for the series) may be obtained by mail order, online, or at the door.

 For complete information and ticket purchases, visit the BAHA website http://berkeleyheritage.com, e-mail baha@berkeleyheritage.com, or call (510) 841-2242.



Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Award-winning Alameda Queen Anne

Alameda A.W. Pattiani Queen Anne with its ROBA-designed façade restoration
This recently completed project in Alameda, CA  by Rynerson + O'Brien Architecture has just been awarded an Alameda Architectural Preservation Award.

Here is more about this fantastic house and what was done to revive it:

"This building is one of several remaining A.W. Pattiani houses in Alameda and Berkeley.  The house had been significantly altered by additions and expansions on its west and north elevations, by the removal of original ornament and by the application of wood shingles over original wood siding and previously ornamented surfaces. The west addition included a wraparound porch where none previously existed, covered by a squat, glass-roofed pergola supported on classical style columns.  The result of the cumulative changes was a house that was no longer recognizable as an A.W. Pattiani Queen Anne.
Queen Anne house façade before (left) and after restoration
"The current owners wanted to restore the character of A.W. Pattiani’s original design as well as specific Pattiani signature ornamental details to the property. They also needed to address serious water intrusion problems and the ensuing damage that had developed on the wraparound porch. It was not practical for the owners to consider giving up the previous addition and porch, but both additions were inconsistent with the original design and created massing challenges to restoring the main facade.
Pattiani-inspired details
"The solution to this dilemma was to restore the original portion of the structure as closely as possible based on existing Pattiani examples and historical photos, and to rebuild the deteriorated wraparound porch using a vocabulary more compatible with the original house.  This included adding a cupola that effectively conceals the awkward western addition while adding new ornament and massing in proportion to the original façade."  - Steve Rynerson

The house now sports original-style ornament and  a beautiful covered wraparound porch with many of the "gingerbread" details that A.W. Pattiani was known for. 
Interior of the new covered porch

Restoration and ornamental carpentry by Guild member Skeeter Jones / Clearheart Design.  Fellow Guild member Lynne Rutter collaborated with the owners to design the color scheme, adding a robin's egg blue/green ceiling to help showcase the covered porch. 
Interior of the porch under the new cupola
Exterior Painting and gilding by Olson's Painting, Alameda, CA.
Photos in this post by Steve Rynerson
more details at the Rynerson O'Brien blog.

Sunday, March 17, 2013

Guild Members win Prestigeous Palladio Award

Congratulations!! to Steve Rynerson and Paul Duchsherer for winning the prestigious Palladio Award for Residential Restoration, for their collaborative work on the restoration of the McDonald Mansion in Santa Rosa.
This project included the work of many guild members and you can see more images of the progress of this restoration here.

Sunday, February 10, 2013

McDonald Mansion- The formal interiors at Mableton

Here are some more amazing images form the newly restored McDonald Mansion or Mableton, in Santa Rosa, California.
Have a seat and savor this fantastic period interior!
Main Entry Hall
The project was spearheaded by Steve Rynerson of Rynseron & O'Brien Architecture.    The interiors in particular feature the work of many Artistic License members, including  Paul Duchscherer as interior designer/historic design consultant; huge amounts of wallpaper by Bradbury and Bradbury; leaded art glass by Reflections Studios and Theodore Ellison; and faux finishes by George Shadow.


The Main Hall design sets the tone for the surrounding public spaces, with its bold structure of Eastlake-style mahogany woodwork, and a striking assemblage of Aesthetic Movement wallpaper patterns. 

The Library
The Library has 16 foot ceiling and a suspended glass-floored, period-style cast iron and steel catwalk to access the upper bookcases. Detailed in the Eastlake taste, the mahogany mantel features fifteen vintage Minton tiles.


Neo-Grec style wallpapers enliven the panels of the beamed and coffered ceiling.


Gentlemens Parlor
The Gothic Revival style Gentlemens’ Parlor features an unusual oak wainscot design adapted from a period example by English architect William Burges.  The wallpaper adapts an 1880s pattern by William Morris that was first commissioned for St. James’ Palace in London. The coffered ceiling treatment is grained to match the room’s oak woodwork. Seen through the wide pocket doors, the fireplace end of the Main Hall is overhung by two (of four) matching bracket chandeliers that were custom made for this project.
 
Turkish Parlor
Reviving a period tradition of exotically decorated retreats that were often called “smoking rooms”, the Turkish Parlor for Mableton, conceived in the Moorish Revival-style, here takes the form of a domed octagonal pavilion. Comprised of stacked, rotated, and corbelled octagons of graduating sizes, the dome rests on a delicate, ebonized oak framework of pierced screens, horseshoe arches, and slender columns.
 
Note the way mirrors are used in the Turkish Parlor
The Ladies' Parlor
Mableton’s Ladies’ Parlor has a feminine, French-Revival style. The previously flat sixteen-foot ceiling has been reconfigured into a room-wide barrel vault, and embellished with a Neo-classical style wallpaper treatment. Glazed and gilded painted finishes on the Louis XVI-style woodwork complement the panelized wallpaper insets, with mirrors used to amplify the light and views.
The Map Room
Mableton’s Map Room is a newly-created mezzanine-level room accessed via the Library’s spiral stair and catwalk.  As the name implies, the room houses the owners’ collection of antique maps, and the cartographic theme is reinforced by a stained glass compass rose window designed and fabricated  by Theodore Ellison Designs.  The neo-grec wallpaper scheme of the Library expands into the three-part ceiling and panelized walls of the Map Room which doubles as a private study.
Main Stair Hall
The design of the Main Stair Hall interprets the Anglo-Japanese mode of Aesthetic Movement taste, with repeating fan motifs and linear outlines adapted from Mableton’s intact, original staircase railing.

At the stair landing is a matching suite of Japanesque leaded art glass windows custom designed for this project.
Dining Room
Mableton’s Dining Room is an elongated octagon in plan with a double-coved, ribbed ceiling, and shares the Main Hall’s “Stick/Eastlake” design aesthetic.  Dark mahogany millwork frames wall, frieze and ceiling areas filled with gold and metallic accented wallpapers inspired by the Victorian avant-garde designs of Christopher Dresser.   A dining set comfortably seats  fourteen and is composed of antique and reproduction chairs as well as a table custom built to the geometry of the room.


Master Sitting Room
Mableton’s Master Sitting Room is part of a suite of rooms that also includes the Master Bedroom and Master Bath that occupies one of two new wings built at the rear of Mableton’s main floor. The Master Sitting Room’s interior includes a gently vaulted ceiling whose form is echoed in the arched opening that frames the south-facing bay window.  
Custom embroidered curtain detail in the master sitting room made by Dianne Ayres.
  
Read more details about this stunning project at  Rynerson & O'Brien's blog.
All Photographs in this post by MarkCitret.

Friday, February 8, 2013

Mableton- Exterior Restoration

Rynerson O'Brien Architecture have just completed a massive 5 year restoration of the McDonald Mansion, also known as Mableton, a beautiful historic mansion in Santa Rosa, California.
The exterior is shown here in a before and after picture---
before and after:  Mableton's exterior restored  photo by George Shadow
In addition to repairs and improvements, ornamental cresting, verandas, window, and other details that had been altered or removed were restored.
Mableton Veranda restored photo by George Shadow
You can read all about this incredible project in detail with many before and after pictures at the Rynerson-O'Brien blog.

The interior of this splendid house has also been restored and decorated with the help of many guild members.  Stay tuned for more exciting photos!



Thursday, January 31, 2013

Cheers!!

Brotha Clint from the Bayview Opera House, and Judy Nemzoff, Director of Community Arts and Education for the San Francisco Arts Commission, at the Artisans Ball, December 8, 2012.  photo by Adrian Mendoza

CHEERS!  The members of Artistic License would like to thank everyone who came to the fabulous Artisans Ball last month at the Green Room in San Francisco.  The event celebrated the Guild's 30th anniversary and raised $4,500 for the Bayview Opera House and its community and arts programs.

Here are some highlights from this swell affair!  Thanks to Adrian Mendoza for the photography.

Guild members Erik Kramvik, Allan Dragge, Steve Rynerson, and Riley Doty enjoy the view of City Hall from the loggia of the Green Room.
Guild members Tim Hanson and Lorna Kollmeyer greeting people at the Artisans Ball.
The very elegant Karen Kiely and Neill Allen dancing at the Artisans Ball
 Jill Pilaroscia (a founding member of Artistic License) with wallpaper designer and Hall of Fame member Bruce Bradbury and his partner, Romeo.
revelers at the Artisans Ball
Lorna Kollmeyer and her band, the Dunes, performed at the Artisans Ball
Guild members Bruce Bradbury, Paul Duchscherer, and Steve Rynerson on background vocals
Dancing at the Artisans Ball
Guild president Chris Yerke with a State Senate Resolution honoring Artistic License presented by Brotha Clint of the Bayview Opera House.
Paul Duchscherer sits in with the band...  did you know he can sing?  Well now you do!
Melinda Morey, Erin Mahoney, guild member Lynne Rutter, and Erika Von Petrin.
Artistic License members Paul Duchscherer, Elise Shadow, and Erik Kramvik.
Chris Yerke and Peter Morenstein at the Artisans Ball.


all photos in the post © by Adrian Mendoza

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Jane Powell 1952-2012


It is with great sadness that we announce the loss of our dear Jane E. Powell, author, linoleum expert, historian, and notorious curmudgeon. 
Jane passed away  peacefully on the morning of November 11, 2012 surrounded by friends in her beloved Bungamansion in Oakland. She will be greatly missed by countless fans and friends, and especially by us. 
Ms. Powell was a restoration consultant, house restorer, lecturer, and author of six books, including Bungalow Kitchens; Bungalow Bathrooms; Bungalow Details: Exterior; Bungalow Details: Interiors; Bungalow: The Ultimate Arts and Crafts Home; and Linoleum.
A long-time Artistic License member and former president of the guild, Jane was well-known as “the bad girl of bungalow writing”  and often described herself as  "historian, author, and notorious curmudgeon."
As a hands-on restorer, she brought ten vintage homes back to life and sold them to appreciative buyers, as well as restoring her own home, the 1905 Jesse Matteson house, affectionately known as "the Bungamansion."   The practical experience of restoring houses armed her with the kind of concrete knowledge that can only be gained by screwing up, and thus she was uniquely qualified to help her clients avoid many of the pitfalls that go along with restoring an older home. As a restoration consultant, she helped homeowners as well as house museums with their kitchens, bathrooms, interior and exterior paint colors, and other aspects of restoration and renovation.
Ms. Powell wrote for magazines including Old House Journal, Style 1900, and American Bungalow. She wrote a monthly column as well as feature articles for the San Francisco Chronicle Magazine, and her opinion pieces appeared in the Berkeley Daily Planet, the Oakland Tribune, and on Oaklandnews.com. She also appeared on HGTV's Curb Appeal and Food Network's Ultimate Kitchens.
Jane at the Bungamansion benefit in 2011, photo by Melanie Hofmann
She was a popular and entertaining speaker, and lectured at conferences including The Grove Park Arts and Crafts Conference, Pasadena's Craftsman Weekend, Seattle's Bungalow Fair, the Restoration and Renovation Conference, and many others. She also spoke for preservation organizations, neighborhood associations, home builders groups, and historic district organizations across the country, and even at kitchen showrooms and retail businesses. In addition to the talks based on her various books, she spoke on related subjects including historic preservation, development issues, and the built environment.

Jane is survived by her sisters, Nancy Klapak, Mary (Rob) Enderle, Karin and Brian Klapak her niece and nephew and many loyal friends. A memorial service is planned for January 2013. Donations can be made to the East Bay SPCA-Oakland in honor of her many cats at Jane’s website via PayPal www.janepowell.org/tinykitties .    Sympathy cards or donations can also be sent to her sister Mary Enderle at 389 Photinia Lane, San Jose, CA 95127.

Monday, October 15, 2012

Textile Studio & Friends

Textile Studio and Friends - a pop-up shop opens in Rockridge!

 
Guild member Dianne Ayres of Arts & Crafts Period Textiles has opened a pop-up shop at 5550 College Ave. in Rockridge neighborhood of Oakland. 
Textile Studio & Friends at 5550 College Ave
The shop features a antiques and contemporary works, mostly Arts & Crafts style, alongside Dianne's famous hand-crafted textiles, antiquarian books and ephemera as well as contemporary books, including a complete selection of books by Jane Powell.  Other Artistic License members whose work  is featured in the shop include Theodore Ellison, Jana Olsen, and Debey Zito.  
Textile Studio & Friends at 5550 College Ave, Oakland
Visit Textile Studio & Friends at 5550 College Avenue, Oakland through the end of the 2012.

Friday, October 5, 2012

The Artisans Ball

click image for tickets!

2012 marks the 30th year of Artistic License in the Bay Area!

To celebrate, we are throwing a gala party and fundraiser benefiting the historic  Bayview Opera House restoration and community programs.  Join us Saturday, December 8, 2012  at the Green Room in San Francisco for the Artisans' Ball!

Advanced tickets are now on sale! 



Bayview Opera House  - Ruth Williams Memorial Theatre 
is a nonprofit community cultural and arts center.



San Francisco Arts Commission serves as landlord for this City-owned building, which opened in 1888 as the South San Francisco Opera  House. It is San Francisco's oldest theater and on the National Register of Historic Places

Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Debey Zito at Sonoma County Museum September 6

Guild member Debey Zito of Debey Zito Fine Furniture and Design will be speaking at the Sonoma County Museum for the 24th annual "Artistry in Wood" workshop. The talk is entitled  "Art Nouveau and Arts and Crafts Furniture: Elements of Design"

Debey will be discussing the major influences in her designs, including Art Nouveau, Arts and Crafts, and Asian traditions.

Thursday, September 6, 2012   6:00 PM
Sonoma County Museum, 425 Seventh Street
Santa Rosa, California, US, 95401

more information at  www.sonomacountymuseum.org

Monday, January 30, 2012

Resurrecting a Roman Soldier

Guild member Chris Yerke of Restoration Workshop, shares the details of  restoring an historic fireplace in a San Francisco Queen Anne house.
the beautifully restored fireplace
In 2010 I was engaged in the exterior restoration of a Queen Anne house by the prolific designer/builder Cranston and Keenan.   Cranston and Keenan homes are staples of San Francisco’s Western Addition. This house turned out to be a particular jewel. It was clearly one of their more expensive models, replete with many fine examples of interior decorative arts products of the day. Moreover, during its 117 year existence it had survived practically free of painting and remodeling. It had suffered some deterioration with time and neglect, but was largely intact as a time capsule of this particular architect’s style.

Due to the zeal of our passionate client, it was not long before I was tasked with a number of interior restoration projects, concurrent with the exterior restoration. Among these was the restoration of the 5 fireplaces.  Like the other fireplaces there were loose and/or missing tiles, the firebox was badly deteriorated, and the wood surround could use a touch up from a restorer. The owner had been lamenting the long lost art tile containing the upper torso of the reclining Roman soldier.
the missing torso tile
As with many fields of endeavor, the secret to being a good general contractor lies not in knowing everything, but rather in knowing how to ask the right questions. I went to my favorite source for all things tile, Riley Doty of Doty Tile.  Accustomed to hunting up missing period hardware, I asked Riley what he figured my chances would be of coming up with a surviving example of that tile.  He laid my odds at something just slightly better than finding the Holy Grail. He explained that these tiles were made in a variety of different glazes.  The odds of finding one that had survived demolition or been stuck in some hidden corner of an old stock room were quite remote, and if I did find one, the chances of it having the matching glaze would be astronomical.    He then offered that he knew an artisan who could reproduce the missing tile. He gave me the contact information for L’Esperance Tile Works in Rock City Falls, NY.


Catalogue page from American Encaustic Tile Co.

In order to reproduce the tile, we would need some idea of what the original looked like.  Riley came to the rescue by contacting the Tile Heritage Foundation to see if this set of tiles was to be found in their collection of old tile catalogues. His theory that the tiles were made by the American Encaustic Tile Company turned out to be correct, and the Tile Heritage foundation quickly located the catalogue page with photos of the three roman soldier tile sets, exactly as seen on the fireplace.

Linda sculpting the Roman soldier in wax
I removed the remaining two tiles of the set, packed them very well, and sent them off to Linda Ellet of L’Esperance Tile works. Linda would be tasked with sculpting the reproduction tile.  She explained that among the challenges would be shrinkage in drying and firing.  Because clay shrinks, you have to make a calculated guess and sculpt the tile appropriately oversized in its wet state. Then you hope everything will line up exactly with the originals after shrinkage. It is a real head-scratcher, involving years of experience offset by the fact that the shrinkage of clay is subject to many factors not entirely controllable by the artisan. The original sculptor had the advantage sculpting all three tiles at the same time, vastly aiding his chances that all the many visual elements would align from one tile to the next.

Tile figure sculpted in wax
In the end, Linda sculpted the entire panel of three tiles to aid her in the process.  She did such a superb job that the head tile aligns beautifully with original center tile. The reproduction is installed in its place at the head of the two originals.
The restored fireplace
Riley Doty reset loose tiles, realigned shifted tiles, and fixed a multitude of grouting issues.  United Chimney, Inc. rebuilt the firebox and smoke shelf, expanding depth of the firebox in the process and adding a damper. The restored product is the result of a pleasing and fruitful collaboration between highly skilled artisans.